Marriage: An Overlooked Factor in Economic Growth

  Patrick F. Fagan, Senior Fellow and Director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute (MARRI)

Patrick F. Fagan, Senior Fellow and Director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute (MARRI)

The economic well-being of the United States is strongly related to marriage, which is a choice about how we channel our sexuality. The implications of sexual choices are apparent when comparing family structures across basic economic measures such as employment, income, net worth, poverty, receipt of welfare, and child economic well-being. In all of these the stable, intact married family outperforms other sexual partnering structures; hence the economy rises with the former and encounters more difficulties and inefficiencies as it diverges from it.

About the Speaker

Patrick F. Fagan is Senior Fellow and Director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute (MARRI), which examines the relationships among family, marriage, religion, community, and America's social problems, as illustrated in the social science data.

A native of Ireland, Pat has a professional graduate degree in psychology (Dip. Psych.) as well as a Ph.D. from University College Dublin. Fagan started his career as a grade school teacher in Cork, Ireland, then returned to college to become a psychologist.

He was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary for Family and Community Policy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by President George H.W. Bush, before spending the next thirteen years at the Heritage Foundation where he was a senior fellow.

Details

When: Friday, June 17, 2011, 7:30 - 8:45 AM
Where: Putnam Investments, One Post Office Square